Strengthening Constitutional Self-Government

Ashbrook

Faculty

Stephen R. Thomas

ThomasS

Stephen Thomas

Honored Visiting Graduate Faculty 

thomass1@ohiodominican.edu

Stephen R. Thomas is Associate Professor of Political Science at Ohio Dominican University.  He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Harvard University and an A.B. in Government from Oberlin College.

While still a graduate student, Dr. Stephen Thomas was an instructor in Political Science at Westminster College (Missouri) and Smith College. Later, he was an assistant professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, where he was director of the Master’s Program in Health Policy and Management, and associate professor at Fordham University, where he won a Graduate Teaching Award.

For five years, he was on the board of directors of Vanderheyden Hall, a large child-care agency in Troy, New York, and served as its president for two terms.

Dr. Thomas was a program officer at The Commonwealth Fund in New York City, and a social studies teacher at La Salle Academy and the Bronx High School of Science.

In 2010, Dr. Thomas won ODU’s Conley Award for outstanding teaching.

He is the co-author of “Asking the Wrong Questions: The Environmental Protection Agency from Nixon to Clinton” (1994). He contributed two chapters to Jonathan Betz Brown, “Health Capital Financing: Structuring Politics and Markets to Produce Community Health” (1988), co-authored a chapter in A.D. Woodhead and others, “Assessment of Risk from Low-level Exposure to Radiation and Chemicals” (1985), and co-authored a paper on physician reimbursement in the Journal of the American Medical Association (1987). He has also published articles in Science, Technology & Human ValuesInternational Journal of Politics, Culture, and SocietyPublic Affairs Quarterly; and Policy Currents. Articles on “Cheney v. District Court (2004)” and “Deregulation in the 1970s” appear in the “Oxford Encyclopedia of American Political, Policy, and Legal History.”

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